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Fair warning here, folks. My book recommendations over the next couple of weeks (this week and next for sure, possibly the week after), are going to feature classic novels. Why? Because I firmly believe that the classics novels are worth reading. But, unfortunately, not everyone has had the chance to read them all, including myself.

Anne of Green Gables is one of those classic novels (and series) that I absolutely love. I’ve read this novel numerous times, though I didn’t read it for the first time until I was in my late teens. And, because I enjoyed it so much as a teenager (and still enjoy it as an adult), I don’t feel at all bad recommending it to other older readers who haven’t picked it up yet.

Anne’s tale is one that just about everyone is familiar with. A young, redheaded orphan is taken in by Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert, siblings who were looking to take in a boy who could help around their farm. Anne has many adventures in this first book, and ends up gaining a lot of friends, knowledge and life experience.

My favourite aspect of Anne of Green Gables is, of course, Anne herself. Anne is such a fun-loving, imaginative girl. It’s hard not to read the novel without smiling when she’s happy or feeling your chest tighten up when she’s sad. Admittedly, the large blocks of Anne’s dialogue could be a bit much for some people, but I quite liked them. They helped me to truly understand the character, and I forged a much stronger bond with her than I would have if the dialogue hadn’t been present.

L.M. Montgomery also does an absolutely wonderful job of describing the scenery in the novel. I could see the Cuthbert house as I was reading – both its interior and exterior. And both the Haunted Woods and Lovers Lane were so clear in my mind that it was as though I had walked through them myself.

Yes, Anne of Green Gables is a children’s novel. But it’s so well written, and Anne is so easy to bond with, that I can’t imagine many adults who wouldn’t enjoy reading it.

Goodreads summary

She’ll have to go back.” Matthew and Marilla Cuthbert had decided to adopt an orphan. They wanted a nice sturdy boy to help Matthew with the farm chores. The orphanage sent a girl instead – a mischievous, talkative redhead who the Cuthberts thought would be no use at all. But as soon as Anne arrived at the snug, white farmhouse called Green Gables, she knew she wanted to stay forever. And the longer Anne stayed, the harder it was for anyone to imagine Green Gables without her.